Posted February 15, 2018 03:25:08 It can seem like the internet is full of data sets, but the new laws which take effect on January 1 will have a “fuzziness” to them, the Federal Government has warned.

Copyright holders will also be able to challenge claims made against them under the new legislation, the Australian Copyright Council (ACCC) said. “

A fair dealing approach to copyright is critical for our economy and the global economy as a whole.”

Copyright holders will also be able to challenge claims made against them under the new legislation, the Australian Copyright Council (ACCC) said.

The new laws are part of an overall overhaul of copyright laws, including a ban on copying and distribution of copyright-protected material.

They will also require ISPs to notify copyright holders if they intend to “re-create” or “modify” a work, while new rules also apply to works in transit.

The Government says it has also made some changes to the definition of what constitutes a “copyrightable work”.

These include a new definition of “material” that is protected under copyright and new categories that include “material that is likely to cause harm” and “material used in a way likely to provoke or incite a breach of copyright”.

The changes were announced by the Government on Wednesday, with an online survey of 1,000 Australian people being conducted.

The survey found that the majority of respondents (57 per cent) believed the existing laws should be changed.

About two-thirds (66 per cent), or 2.9 million Australians, supported the new Copyright Acts.

But the online survey also found that those who supported the existing copyright laws felt they were not working.

Only 22 per cent of respondents said they felt they had been able to comply with their obligations under copyright, while 38 per cent said they were unable to.

There was also a huge divide over whether the existing legislation was effective.

The majority of Australian respondents (56 per cent): did not feel the current laws were working (58 per cent); or were too weak to deal with copyright infringement (56 percent).

Just under half of respondents were not aware that the current legislation was in force, while two-fifths did not know if it had been updated since it was first introduced.

The Copyright Council said the online poll results were “quite concerning” and it would be “unacceptable” if the Government’s proposals were not taken into account.

The copyright community and the Australian Government are due to meet in Canberra on February 20.

Topics: copyright, laws, government-and-politics, federal-government, federal—state-issues, law-crime-and -chief-agent, law, australia, qld

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